white queen doodley oodle. I’m going to stay on sketchbook express until I buy a new computer. So, eh. yep.

psyducked:

edible nudes are finally possible

(Source: 6gay)

doodledoodledoodleDOODLEDOODLEDOODLE Not an actual character from anywhere, just messin around.

doodledoodledoodleDOODLEDOODLEDOODLE Not an actual character from anywhere, just messin around.

Two witches I doodled. Messing with colors.

QuestionHey lady! I've grown to love you and your art dearly (following you on the Instagram, but found out you had a tumblr just now and YEHA). I'm a pretty new digital artist, just figuring out the how to's. Was wondering if you had some tips and tricks, and maybe a suggestion for programs for beginners? I've been leaning pretty heavy towards sketchbook pro (already using the free version) and paint tool SAI, but would love some input from an artist I admire. Thanks! (Hope I'm not a bother) Answer

kirstendoodles:

I wrote an essay for you D’: I’m sorry!

You’re so sweet and not a bother at all :D Sketchbook Pro is awesome, especially for quick digital sketching and color!  I’ve always been a huge fan of how SB Pro laid out their interface as well, I felt like it was super user friendly to an artist and really great for a beginner artists and experienced artists alike, since the tools are very simple and straight forward.

The other program I just got recently and I really like is Manga Studio! The tools are super nice and function a lot like traditional tools, which I really like. I haven’t converted to it completely from Photoshop yet, but I’m getting a handle on it in the hopes that I can. Manga Studio is also super affordable too! It’s actually on sale on Amazon right now for only $30. Paint tool Sai I’ve never got around to using myself, I have a Mac :C but that’s okay, I’m happy enough with all the programs I do have.

With all that said- honestly if you get a good handle on one drawing program, learning other programs will come all the easier. Ultimately, while I personally have a preference for programs that give me the most traditional feel with it’s tools- the program isn’t what makes the artist. As long as you have the traditional skillset- knowledge of anatomy, structuring drawings and composing images, you can pick up any tool and any program and do amazing things with it. And there’s lots of ways to learn all those traditional skills as well :D I mentioned before a couple of life drawing resources I like before like the Force books and Character Design Notes, and I’ll add Andrew Loomis to that list, seeing as how I forgot him the last time I brought this up!

There’s no real right or wrong way to learn- but looking back on my college days, I think the best thing I did for myself during my years there, that has helped improve my skill and speed in the long run was to just take a step back from the computers and the programs and just draw in sketchbooks and take traditional drawing and painting classes. Don’t get me wrong- I don’t think traditional art is better than digital, Neither do I think digital is better than traditional. But my personal belief is that if you have the traditional skillset and know how, it can only enhance your digital work to it’s fullest potential. Traditional can completely inform your digital work, and visa versa actually! Sketchbook Pro’s Copic color palette actually helped me understand their different colors and what looks good together, so when I started buying more color markers for my collection I found it a little easier to place colors together and figure out how to blend them all thanks to SB Pro.

Whatever you decide to use, hell use them all if you like, just make sure you’re always enhancing your skills and your knowledge as an artist in general. And never stop carrying your sketchbooks with you! 

Thank you for your question love <3 I know that was long but you asked really great questions and I hope I answered them well and you found it helpful. 

THANK YOU SO MUUUCH!!! This is super useful. I ALWAYS try to have a sketchbook on hand and this definitely reconfirmed to me the importance of traditional along with digital. I am very excited to soak up like a sponge Andrew Loomis, wasn’t aware of that rad resource before. I have been so pleasantly surprised with all the awesome artists replying to my proddy questions! Thanks again! Much Love!!!

Recent artwork. Was messing with liquid inks, I like the vibrancy.

chernyye:

Ah look at the crappy water color art. My affection for traditional art is bludgeoning me. It’s all fun though. Crayola watercolor sets and ballpoint pens are where the magic is at.

Woop. Posted it to the wrong blog. Still mine. chernyye:

Ah look at the crappy water color art. My affection for traditional art is bludgeoning me. It’s all fun though. Crayola watercolor sets and ballpoint pens are where the magic is at.

Woop. Posted it to the wrong blog. Still mine. chernyye:

Ah look at the crappy water color art. My affection for traditional art is bludgeoning me. It’s all fun though. Crayola watercolor sets and ballpoint pens are where the magic is at.

Woop. Posted it to the wrong blog. Still mine.

chernyye:

Ah look at the crappy water color art. My affection for traditional art is bludgeoning me. It’s all fun though. Crayola watercolor sets and ballpoint pens are where the magic is at.

Woop. Posted it to the wrong blog. Still mine.

Fun with pens. Pen and paper welcomes me with open arms and smudges. Fun with pens. Pen and paper welcomes me with open arms and smudges.

Fun with pens. Pen and paper welcomes me with open arms and smudges.

A redheaded girl I doodled. Getting used to this whole digital art thing.

A redheaded girl I doodled. Getting used to this whole digital art thing.

A girl I drew for a friend.